Con Sponsorships: Do’s and Don’ts

Are you a fellow indie developer looking to get brand recognition and attention? Sponsoring local (and not so local) conventions can be a great route to take. However, be warned that the kind of treatment you get can vary wildly from con to con. It all depends on their staff and culture.

We’ll focus here on three examples from three actual cons we here at Aes: Brass Revolution interacted with. The names of the cons are left out, since the focus isn’t on chiding or praising them, but to learn about what makes for good and not-so-good sponsorship handling.

Our goal with this article is to highlight the kinds of reactions you can expect so you know whether you’re being treated with respect or getting snubbed. We also want to provide tips to convention runners on how to make sure they’re doing a good job with handling their sponsors.

Example 1: FailCon

Let’s start with the negative, since it’s good to go from low to high. Sometime back we donated about $1000 to sponsor a small gaming con. The arrangement was simple: we give them prizes and giveaway goodies and they’d promote Aes. Specifically, they promised to promote us on social media and had us send an ad for their convention guide.

The result? …Nothing. After we mailed them the items, we never heard anything back from them. In the weeks to the con, no social media posts about Aes. We sent a few check in emails – no reply. The con comes ago, still nothing.

It isn’t until 2 months later we hear back from them. They give us a tracking number and tell us they’re returning the donations that weren’t given away. We were genuinely worried they’d run off with what we sent, so this is good news. The box we got back had nearly everything we’d sent. It looks like they’d completely forgotten to hand out our donations and simply didn’t want to admit it. To this day, we still have no idea if our ad was even published in their guide (probably not).

Example 2: PassableCon

For another gaming con, we donated $750 of material, with the same content as FailCon. Same arrangement: social media promotion, website listing, at-con distro of the prizes. They even threw in some extras like our logo on the volunteer t-shirts.

Pretty soon, they proved better than FailCon: our logo was up on their website! Yay! Actual promotion as promised!

And then…nothing. We sent the ads and t-shirt logos. But no idea if they made it in. Sadly, much of the promise social media boosting didn’t really materialize, either. Hopefully their con went well? At least we know they did help promote us. They met the bare minimum expectation.

Example 3: StellarCon

Our best experience with a con was also one of our first. This was in the early days of the game when we were just starting to produce items we could donate. We gave a con maybe $100 worth of stuff during the weekend. No advance notice. No prearrangement.

What happened? We got a shout out at the closing ceremonies. We were invited back next year, this time as staff to help with tabletop. We had the owner liking our page and following the development. There was communication, there was enthusiasm, and there was a real feeling of being welcome. All for very little! We’ve made sure to stay with this con ever since.

Takeaways

  1. Communicate! Every bad experience can be defined as not keeping in touch or sending out updates. Consider adding sponsors to mailing lists, at least, so they get the same updates as attendees. Let us know you’re alive. Definitely don’t wait 2 months before writing back – but understand that’s still better than nothing. And don’t be afraid to admit you screwed up and forgot. It happens.
  2. Photos! If something is donated, show us! Take a picture of the prize table or the swag bag. One picture will do for multiple sponsors. Show proof what we donated was put to its intended use.
  3. Have defined packages and stick to them. One thing PassableCon did that not even StellarCon had were defined tiers of sponsorship that clearly outlined what we’d get for X amount of donations. It meant we wouldn’t donate too much and get things we didn’t need for promotion and that we could have items – like the convention book ad – ready beforehand. If PassableCon had held to what they promised, they’d be our StellarCon example.
  4. Accept material donations. Money is great, but attendees love STUFF. Free stuff, especially! Getting sponsors to provide things to give away saves you having to buy it yourself. Allow material donation in lieu of monetary ones. That will really benefit indie folks – like us – where that’s mainly what we have to offer.
  5. Consider a variety of promotional avenues in your con. A few were mentioned here: con book ads, giveaways, shout outs at closing ceremonies, t-shirt logos, website placement, social media boosts. Think of more. Banners, bag inserts, and other outlets are all great to have. Just make sure that what you offer, you can deliver. FailCon and PassableCon both fell short because whoever was managing those aspects dropped the ball.

In a separate post, we’ll focus on what makes for good items to donate, how to go about choosing a con (hint: don’t aim big at first), and how to reach out to them.

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One thought on “Con Sponsorships: Do’s and Don’ts

  1. While I can appreciate not throwing Failcon under the bus, mistakes can happen, I do think you should reward Stellarcon by giving it’s name.

    Like

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